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Most of Our Clients Spend More on Kitchen Cabinets & Countertops Than On Our Panels
Just say'in.  Doesn't make much sense to us.  Our panels - something that will make a home stronger, safer and significantly more energy efficient - often offering the homeowner a positive return on investment in the VERY FIRST MONTH - or really high-end and often overpriced cabinets and countertops.
 
Eco-Panels Client Will Save $100,000 Over Life of Mortgage

We at Eco-Panels always like to feature the stories of our clients when they show us how they are saving money from using our product.  One of our more forward looking clients - who actually build homes to a passive house or net zero energy standard for a living - ran some calculations based on actual energy usage of one of their latest homes and is able to claim reliably that the super insulated building envelope, in conjunction with solar panels on their roof and an electric car, will be able to save $100,000 over the life of their home mortgage, compared with having built their home traditionally.  Working with a green building magazine this nice article was published here at the GreenIdeas website:

4016 climate house jacks point.jpg

Structural Insulating Panels make a home ultra-energy efficient.

If this looks like your dream home and you’re anything like me, your first thought is probably ‘how much does it cost’ – and the answer is ‘$60,000 less than you think’.

That’s because the ultra-energy efficient home, by Climate House in Queenstown, costs the same as a conventional house to build, yet uses 95 per cent less power.

The house is built using Structured Insulating Panels (you can read them about on page 48 of the April-May 2015 issue of Green Ideas magazine), which keep the house snug while needing very little money for electricity. And by paying those savings into your mortgage, you can pay it off four years earlier, says Michael Sly of Climate House, resulting in a $60,000 saving on compounded interest, compared to an average home.

More impressively, that saving leaps to $100,000 when you use solar panels and an electric car. Powering your home and vehicle with solar electricity saves you $10,000 a year, says Michael, allowing you to shave a cool $100k off your debt (based on the same assumption that you use the savings to pay off the mortgage earlier).

Michael hopes to offer a home / financing / transport package soon – and is already building a number of efficient houses for clients around New Zealand.

- See more at: http://www.greenideas.co.nz/how-to/building-and-renovation/warmer-and-cheaper#sthash.IX2dNJVq.dpuf
This home will use 95% less energy than a traditionally built home

Structural Insulating Panels make a home ultra-energy efficient.

If this looks like your dream home and you’re anything like me, your first thought is probably ‘how much does it cost’ – and the answer is ‘$60,000 less than you think’.

That’s because the ultra-energy efficient home, by Climate House in Queenstown, costs the same as a conventional house to build, yet uses 95 per cent less power.

The house is built using Structured Insulating Panels (you can read them about on page 48 of the April-May 2015 issue of Green Ideas magazine), which keep the house snug while needing very little money for electricity. And by paying those savings into your mortgage, you can pay it off four years earlier, says Michael Sly of Climate House, resulting in a $60,000 saving on compounded interest, compared to an average home.

More impressively, that saving leaps to $100,000 when you use solar panels and an electric car. Powering your home and vehicle with solar electricity saves you $10,000 a year, says Michael, allowing you to shave a cool $100k off your debt (based on the same assumption that you use the savings to pay off the mortgage earlier).

Michael hopes to offer a home / financing / transport package soon – and is already building a number of efficient houses for clients around New Zealand.


Structural Insulating Panels make a home ultra-energy efficient.

If this looks like your dream home and you’re anything like me, your first thought is probably ‘how much does it cost’ – and the answer is ‘$60,000 less than you think’.

That’s because the ultra-energy efficient home, by Climate House in Queenstown, costs the same as a conventional house to build, yet uses 95 per cent less power.

The house is built using Structured Insulating Panels (you can read them about on page 48 of the April-May 2015 issue of Green Ideas magazine), which keep the house snug while needing very little money for electricity. And by paying those savings into your mortgage, you can pay it off four years earlier, says Michael Sly of Climate House, resulting in a $60,000 saving on compounded interest, compared to an average home.

More impressively, that saving leaps to $100,000 when you use solar panels and an electric car. Powering your home and vehicle with solar electricity saves you $10,000 a year, says Michael, allowing you to shave a cool $100k off your debt (based on the same assumption that you use the savings to pay off the mortgage earlier).

Michael hopes to offer a home / financing / transport package soon – and is already building a number of efficient houses for clients around New Zealand.

- See more at: http://www.greenideas.co.nz/how-to/building-and-renovation/warmer-and-cheaper#sthash.IX2dNJVq.dpuf
Structural Insulating Panels make a home ultra-energy efficient.

If this looks like your dream home and you’re anything like me, your first thought is probably ‘how much does it cost’ – and the answer is ‘$60,000 less than you think’.

That’s because the ultra-energy efficient home, by Climate House in Queenstown, costs the same as a conventional house to build, yet uses 95 per cent less power.

The house is built using Structured Insulating Panels (you can read them about on page 48 of the April-May 2015 issue of Green Ideas magazine), which keep the house snug while needing very little money for electricity. And by paying those savings into your mortgage, you can pay it off four years earlier, says Michael Sly of Climate House, resulting in a $60,000 saving on compounded interest, compared to an average home.

More impressively, that saving leaps to $100,000 when you use solar panels and an electric car. Powering your home and vehicle with solar electricity saves you $10,000 a year, says Michael, allowing you to shave a cool $100k off your debt (based on the same assumption that you use the savings to pay off the mortgage earlier).

Michael hopes to offer a home / financing / transport package soon – and is already building a number of efficient houses for clients around New Zealand.

- See more at: http://www.greenideas.co.nz/how-to/building-and-renovation/warmer-and-cheaper#sthash.IX2dNJVq.dpuf
 
Nice Comment from International Aid Organization Construction Manager

Sorry it has been a while since we have posted to our blog!  Just been so busy - everyone getting ready for Spring building season.  But we recently received a nice comment from the construction manager with an international humanitarian aid organization that I thought I would like to share.

" I researched more than 100 panel companies in United States, Canada and China for our project. Only eco-panels had all the elements that we needed to make our project in North ***** successful. We need a structure that can go up very quickly because our time in country is severely limited. We need a product that is basically complete. Because we cannot obtain anything locally for the completion of the project. The harsh climate of North ***** requires extreme thermal efficiency for both the hot humid summers and cold Windy Winters. Eco-panels does a remarkable job of meeting those requirements. All the people at eco-panels understand their product and understand their customers needs and are great to work with."

Keep it tight!

 
Another Amazing New Construction Testimonial - Record low temps - turned the heat on only once so far!

Greetings Eco-Panels friends;

Below is a nice testimonial from a client ‘Jan’ living “…high on a mountaintop in the Asheville / Black Mountain area of NC”.  They moved into their home late summer and we have already been seeing record low temperatures and record high snow-falls for this time of year and so I dropped her a note to see how they were doing.  They fully bought into our philosophy of when you have a super-insulated building envelope you do not need fancy and expensive sources of heat (or cooling).  In fact for their upstairs (it is a 1,600 sqft two story home) they have simple inexpensive baseboard heat.  Please take a look at the e:mail thread below.  I have not edited her comments one bit.  She used our standard 4.5” thick wall panels (rated at R26 at 52degF) and built and insulated her roof traditionally (contrary to popular belief, most of a home's energy loss is NOT through the roof).

Unfortunately we still see some home energy "experts" trying to get people to spend money on very expensive geothermal heat-pumps or other high end systems for heating and cooling (just because there are tax credits doesn't mean you come out ahead) when really just a downsized high-efficiency HVAC system or even a mini-split or simple baseboard heater is more than enough.  When you have an almost perfectly insulated building envelope, you'd be amazed at the ready sources of heat (and cooling) energy already in your home!  People just have to change the way that they approach this (of course we understand that almost 200 years of stick-frame construction is a hard habit to break).

Regards,
Charles Leahy

Eco-Panels

======================

From: Jan
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2014 8:49 AM
To: Charles Leahy
Subject: Re: How is the house?

Hi Charles,

We are incredibly happy with our house. It is warm and cozy and we have not yet needed to turn on the baseboard heaters! We have had a couple of small fires in our wood stove, and the heat easily warms up the bedrooms upstairs. This morning, although the outside temp is 19 degrees and the wind is strong, it is toasty inside and we haven't needed to start a fire or turn on any heat.

Thanks for checking in. Hooray for Eco-Panels!

All the best,

Jan

Good morning Jan,

That is an amazing story!  I love it. Do you have any other sources of heat for the home beside the wood stove or the baseboard heat?  I do know that refrigerators actually put out a fair bit of heat (which will be retained for your benefit!), and other appliances or lighting may put out heat as well.

Regards,

Charles Leahy

Eco-Panels

(we have just started a facebook page, so if you use facebook and would like to stay up on the latest news from Eco-Panels, please "Like" or "Share" us at www.facebook.com/ecopanelsllc)

From: Jan  
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2014 9:46 AM
To: Charles Leahy
Subject: Re: How is the house?

Hi, Charles,

We do have a mini-split unit sitting on the open stair wall in the living room. We used it a month or so ago for a couple of days in the morning when it was chilly. A half hour would do the trick. But it's been off since then, as we have't been the least big cold. It seems if we have a fire towards evening it keeps things warm for 24 hours, even in this kind of weather.

And of course the kitchen puts off heat as I cook. Also the clothes dryer, on the days it gets used. But all in all, it's a much warmer space than we've ever had. The workers commented in the summer how they'd just step into the house if it got too hot outside, since it was so nice and cool. No need to go to the basement for relief.

We're very content--you make a good product.

Jan

 
More Research Finds Styrene Exposure May Lead to Autism

It is well known that Eco-Panels does not use styrenes - or polystyrene - in the manufacture of our structural insulated panels.  But we estimate that over 90% of the panel manufacturers in the United States (and many parts of the world) do use styrenes as a major component of their foam (like EPS or expanded polystyrene or XPS or extruded polystyrene).  In fact, many well known building scientists advocate if stick building a structure then you should "wrap" the finished building in styrene insulation prior to applying the siding.  When you are trying to build a super-energy tight structure, I'm not sure that enclosing your home in an envelope of styrene is the way to go.

Last week it was reported that exposure to styrenes may double the risk of young children developing Autism.  This exposure could occur either while in the womb or even after birth.  See a full article here, and this same study was published by a number of sources.

Styrenes have long been a common component of cheap insulation, and it has become very popular.  But even back in 2011 the National Institute's of Health (NIH) National Toxicology Review, styrenes were added to their 12th Report on Carcinogens, and they note in their FAQs that two of the largest sources of exposure to the average person were from building materials and cigarette smoke.

When considering insulation for your home, please consider the safety of the materials you are using.  And please consider Eco-Panels - our inert closed cell foam does not off-gas and there are no similar health warnings against our urethane foam.

 
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